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Archive | Developments

What's Happening in:  East Passyunk Crossing 

25 Townhomes Replacing Cabinet Warehouse on 600 block of McClellan

By Sequoia Medley for the Passyunk Post

Say goodbye to this sad view. 6th and McClellan looking northwest. Google Maps.

The September 12th meeting of the East Passyunk Crossing Civic Association’s Zoning Committee was more crowded than usual. Neighbors overflowed the available seating at the East Passyunk Community Center. Although another property was discussed, most were there to see the presentation about the redevelopment of the north side of the 600 block of McClellan Street.

…and say hello to these handsome townhomes. CANNODesign.

This much-anticipated project proposes to replace the cabinet warehouse currently located along the north side of the 600 block of Moore Street to allow for the construction of 25 single-family townhouses. Developer Kumas Homes also has plans to build multi-family units on Moore Street, but this presentation focused expressly on the McClellan Street section of the property.

View of the warehouse on the south side of the 600 block of McClellan, looking east. Google Maps.

Future view. Provided by CANNOdesign.
Designs by CANNOdesign show running-bond brick facades with metal canopies over the entry doors. Aluminum-sided pilot houses allow access to roof decks with metal railings. The facades alternate from light gray/tan to darker red brick.

This was the third time the developer met with the community. Two prior information-gathering sessions helped inform the plans presented. As in previous meetings, parking was a primary focus of the discussion. During their presentation the developers repeatedly pointed out design features that were direct responses to feedback from the neighbors, including:

  • Elimination of curb cuts, creating 5 additional on-street parking spots on the block
  • Provision of up to two private parking spaces per new residence accessed by a shared-drive aisle which will bisect the block, running east/west from 6th to 7th Streets
  • No gate on the driveway
  • A dedicated trash room for each residence

View of parking details. Note “Future Development” site along Moore Street. CANNOdesign.

The project requires zoning variances since the developer hopes to create one lot rather than 25 separate parcels, in part to provide the parking in the rear. Owners of these row homes will be part of a homeowners association which will maintain the parking area. A variance is also required since the parking spaces eliminate the required rear yard.
The developer stressed their good-faith efforts to listen and respond to the community since, ‘by-right’ they could make a number of different design choices. One concession to neighbors is the recent removal of towing signs to free-up parking on the block. Although some disagreed with the very nature of the development, many neighbors expressed support for the project.
In response to the desire for more greening, the properties will feature green roofs, as well as planting spaces in the front of the buildings. Developers also agreed to donate land on the 700 block of Emily Street to preserve a community garden used by residents of the area’s Burmese and Bhutanese community.

“Language Labs” mural on the 7th Street facade of the building.

Many neighbors voiced sadness at the potential loss of the “Language Labs” mural by artist Shira Walinksky. Located on the 7th Street side of the property, the colorful mural was completed in 2015 as part of the Southeast by Southeast project. The developer is in discussion with Mural Arts about possibilities of preserving the public art, or creating another work at the site.

A view of the building from 7th and McClellan, looking east, before the mural was completed in 2015. Google Maps.

Practical concerns about debris remediation during demolition were addressed, as well as the potential impact on SEPTA’s 47 bus route.
Although support for the project among attendees was mixed, a majority of those present voted in favor of the project. The EPX Civic Zoning Committee board also voted in favor of the project.
If approved by the Zoning Board of Adjustment (ZBA), the developers hope to start work in three to six months. 20-days notice will be provided to neighbors before demolition begins.
This project will go before the ZBA on Wednesday, September 19th between 2pm and 5pm. Zoning hearings are open to the public to advocate for or against the project. ZBA meetings are held on the 18th floor of 1515 Arch Street.
EPX Zoning Meetings are held on the second Wednesday of the month at the East Passyunk Community Center, 1025 Mifflin Street.

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What's Happening in:  Hawthorne :  Passyunk Square :  Point Breeze 

South Philly Developments Round-up

If you’ve been away the past week or so, here are some development stories have missed…

Hawthorne

The vacant lots at 1114 and 1116 Carpenter Street may soon be developed. A rendering installed on a fence at the site shows an image of two, four-story rowhomes with garages. As Naked Philly notes, “the project hasn’t started down the path to permits,” and the garages will require a variance that may not be easily granted.


Passyunk Square

702-706 Latona Street was home to the Whilldin Pottery Co. from the 1870s until the early 1900s. By the 1940s the company had relocated and its site, running from Latona Street through to Wharton Street, was vacant. Part of the site was developed into rowhouses in the 1980s. Plan Philly reports that the remaining portion of the lot may soon be redeveloped. The current site is described as a hidden oasis:

Inside this 13,300 square-foot refuge from the noise and neon of Passyunk Square, bushes flower, willowy grasses sway in the breeze, and enormous golden koi fish swim in a pond.

The new development will will bring 10 hotly-contested “townhomes” to the site:

For developer Maxwell Bassman, the de-facto public green is an opportunity to build more homes in a suddenly very desirable — and profitable— neighborhood. Last week, the developer won approval from the city’s Zoning Board of Adjustment for variances needed to move forward with a plan for 10 four-story townhomes with garages and an internal driveway.

Neighbors may appeal the ZBA’s decision.

For history’s sake, here’s an ad for the pottery company that once occupied the site:

The Whilldin Pottery Co. manufactured clay pots at 713 Wharton Street on the eastern side of the Latona Street site. (Newspapers.com)

And here’s the pottery company’s proposed replacement:

A rendering of the 10-townhouse development proposed for 706-724 Latona St. ( credit: Maxwell Bassman)

A rendering of the 10-townhouse development proposed for 706-724 Latona St. (credit: Maxwell Bassman)


Point Breeze

Over in Point Breeze, changes are underway on the 2100 block of Annin Street. 2114 Annin Street, a suburban-style townhome, was originally built as affordable housing by South Philadelphia H.O.M.E.S. in the early 1980s. The home, and its adjacent yard, is slated to be replaced by three new homes. According to the blog, “We understand that this project would be a partnership between the longtime owner of the property and a developer, with the owner getting one of the new homes.”

2104 Annin Street from Google Street View.

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What's Happening in:  All over South Philly 

South Philly Food Co-op Is Alive & Well — and Busy As Ever

Note from the Editor:  a reader informed us that she’d heard the Food Co-op’s new store was being replaced by a deli. “Say it ain’t so!” she implored us. Well, we’re happy to report that it’s “Fake News: South Philly Edition”… 

By Carolyn Huckabay, Board of Directors, South Philly Food Co-op

The South Philly Food Co-op is as busy as ever this summer, from ushering in new board members, hosting community events, and building major momentum in their Capital Campaign.

In June, we told you about the Co-op’s “Kitchen Crawl: A Traveling Cocktail Party” — a progressive happy hour that took attendees on a tour of five South Philly homes and gardens. The tour ended with a sneak peek at their future location at 2031 S. Juniper St. The event was a great success, raising thousands of dollars toward the capital campaign, adding some new member-owners, and sharing a tour of the space.

Visitors receive a tour of the Food Co-op’s future space at 2031 S. Juniper St.

To build the store, the Co-op hired Philadelphia-based small business owner Buckminster Green as general contractor. Phase 1 of construction began this spring, and included framing out the store. This will allow the landlord to complete their agreed-upon improvements, including electrical and HVAC installation and distribution. Be on the lookout for the storefront which will be installed later this summer, thanks to the City of Philadelphia’s Storefront Improvement Program.

Kitchen Crawl participants on tour. Photo courtesy Food Co-op.

Buckminster Green will begin Phase 2 as soon as the Co-op reaches their Capital Campaign goals, and support from member-owners and the South Philly community at large has never been stronger. As of today, the Co-op has raised nearly $200,000 in member loans, and they’re 919 member-owners strong. With an overall fundraising goal of just over $1 million, there’s still work to do, so they need everyone’s help — dare we say cooperation — to keep up the momentum and bring in the funds needed to break ground!

Next Thursday, August 2, the Co-op will host a happy hour at Pistolas Del Sur, with drink specials and proceeds benefiting the Co-op. Come join the celeberartion and get all your questions answered.

If you’d like to get involved by becoming a member-owner, making a loan, or volunteering, please email general@southphillyfoodcoop.org. Or join the mailing list to receive the latest news from the Co-op!

 

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What's Happening in:  East Passyunk Crossing 

Irwin’s, upstairs at Bok, debuts tonight!

Irwin’s, the new upscale cocktail bar and restaurant at Bok, debuts this evening with an invitation-only open house reception.  Passyunk Post got a “sneak peek” yesterday which we agreed to keep under wraps until now.  Check out the seriously-cool light fixtures and rustic-industrial decor.

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Foodie Friday: Tasty bits to digest

There’s been a smorgasbord of South Philly restaurant news in the blog-o-sphere. Here are some links to whet your appetite, so to speak…


Northwest corner of 12th & Morris gets a tenant!

The Philadelphia Inquirer’s Michael Kline broke the news yesterday that something’s (finally!) coming to the retail space at the northwest corner of 12th & Morris streets (1646 S. 12th St.):

Separatist Beer Project, the onetime gypsy brewer from Easton known until recently as Sole Artisan Ales, says it has signed a lease for what it calls “a concept bar and beer experience”

Kline spoke with the owner Joe Fay who said the new bar would serve its beer plus wines and coffee. According to Kline:

He described the look as “modern Scandinavian.” The basement, with 10-foot ceilings, will be a kind of rathskeller, with barrel- and bottle-aging and a large table to be used for special events.

The bar could open “as soon as August.”

The space was originally slated for a restaurant by Chris Scarduzio. He bowed out before the building broke ground.  The retail space has sat empty since the building was completed about two years ago. See our previous coverage about the site here and here, and here.

1646 S 12th Street. Photo courtesy of E-Built. www.ebuiltinc.com


Smoke signals

Mike’s BBQ, 1703 S. 11th St., received a nice review in the Cherry Hill Courier-Post.  Writer Emily Teel sums it up: “Barbecue in South Philly? Mike’s isn’t just blowing smoke.”


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What's Happening in:  All over South Philly :  Pennsport :  Point Breeze 

Growth and consequences

We missed covering a number of stories while we were on hiatus.  Here’s the first of several news round-ups in which we play catch-up.

The population of Philadelphia neighborhoods east of Broad Street have grown at a faster pace than neighborhoods west of Broad, including in South Philly, reports Curbed Philadelphia. South Philly’s 19146 zip code (generally Broad to the Schuylkill, Lombard to Tasker) increased by 9.8% from 2000 to 2017.  The 19147 zip code (generally Broad to the Delaware River, Lombard to Tasker) increased by 20.6% during that same period. Each zip code boasts around 40,000 people, with 39,917 in 19146 and 40,490 in 19147.  

Chart courtesy of JLL Philadelphia via Curbed Philly.

 

Some of the population growth west of Broad Street has resulted in the displacement of long-term residents. Point Breeze needs “development without replacement,” writes Claudia Sherrod, a Point Breeze resident and South Philadelphia H.O.M.E.S., Inc. director, in an op ed on whyy.org.  “Over the past decade, Philadelphia has lost a fifth of its housing units that rent to low-income families. I understand real estate is a business but I believe there is a way to conduct business while respecting people of this community.”

And speaking of growth, over in Pennsport there’s Southwark on Reed. The 95-townhouse project built on the site of the former Mt. Sinai Hospital is “…rapidly approaching the finish line,” reports Naked Philly and “the development is completely sold out.”  Demolition at the hospital began in February of 2016.

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